login

Author Topic: 1st visit to Plakia  (Read 2507 times)

Offline micknand

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
    • http://
    • Email
1st visit to Plakia
« on: September 14, 2004, 08:31:18 PM »
Firstly -hi - and thanks to Greecemad for letting me know this forum exists.

If this is in the wrong section sorry.

This year for the first time we had a holiday abroad and went with First Choice to Plakia. We stayed at the Alianthos Beach Hotel and had a blast.

Plakias sure is beautiful. The Hotel was good - clean - good food - friendly staff (some too friendly as we also took our 15 yr old daughter  - the guy who drives for the hotel and has a motor bike was close to being able to sing soprano a few times ) but if i could afford i'd be back there like a shot!

We visited Rethymon a couple of times and bought a Baglamas from a guy who made instruments in his shop/workshop. (I play guitar and haven't a clue about Greek music - i can play Irish jigs on it though  )

This site is great and would have saved me a few hours research if I had got here before going to Plakia.

Looking forward to reading more on here and also returning to Plakia and drinking more Mythos and Raki (might leave the daughter at home though).

Mick

Offline harribobs

  • Regulars
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1830
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - harribobs
    • View Profile
    • http://themanchesters.org
    • Email
1st visit to Plakia
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2004, 03:06:54 PM »
Quote
We visited Rethymon a couple of times and bought a Baglamas from a guy who made instruments in his shop/workshop. (I play guitar and haven't a clue about Greek music - i can play Irish jigs on it though  )

good to hear you enjoyed plakias, it's a wonderful place

now what is a baglamas? is that like a mandolin?

Offline micknand

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
    • http://
    • Email
1st visit to Plakia
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2004, 07:43:27 PM »
Hi

I really wanted a Bouzouki and the same guy had some fabulous looking instruments, but given that the baggage bouncers managed to crack 1 case and badly dint the other I couldn't see us getting it home in one piece :'(

So a baglamas is of the same family of instruments as the Bouzouki, it has 6 strings (tuned D Doct A A DoctDoct) and is about a 3rd the size of a Bouzouki. We managed to wrap it in towels in the case and it survived the journey.

The guy who sold it to us made all the instruments himself, he had a workshop at the end of the sales shop and he told us how his family had hidden English (his words) servicemen during the second world war and when the Germans found out they killed many and burnt his village.

He had in his shop a small piece of wood, charred around the edges that was from his family home. He said it was made of the same wood as the Baglamas, so the Baglamas wouldn't burn  

I have a picture of him and myself by the workshop with the instrument.

The stuff great holidays are made of  

Thanks for your interest.

Mick

Offline harribobs

  • Regulars
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1830
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - harribobs
    • View Profile
    • http://themanchesters.org
    • Email
1st visit to Plakia
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2004, 03:08:18 PM »
Quote
Hi

I really wanted a Bouzouki and the same guy had some fabulous looking instruments, but given that the baggage bouncers managed to crack 1 case and badly dint the other I couldn't see us getting it home in one piece :'(

So a baglamas is of the same family of instruments as the Bouzouki, it has 6 strings (tuned D Doct A A DoctDoct) and is about a 3rd the size of a Bouzouki. We managed to wrap it in towels in the case and it survived the journey.

The guy who sold it to us made all the instruments himself, he had a workshop at the end of the sales shop and he told us how his family had hidden English (his words) servicemen during the second world war and when the Germans found out they killed many and burnt his village.

He had in his shop a small piece of wood, charred around the edges that was from his family home. He said it was made of the same wood as the Baglamas, so the Baglamas wouldn't burn  

I have a picture of him and myself by the workshop with the instrument.

The stuff great holidays are made of   

Thanks for your interest.

Mick
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=2486\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

interesting, i have always been a little dubvious of the bouzoukis i have seen, too much plastic in the scratch guard

well done on finding a hand made instrument (i wouldn't have trusted the baggage handlers though!)

Offline micknand

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
    • http://
    • Email
1st visit to Plakia
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2004, 04:19:54 PM »
Actually i nearly didn't buy anything - as a guitarist looking at an acoustic instrument i always check inside the sound hole, looking for shoddy workmanship - stray glue anything that would indicate the instrument has not received much attention to detail.

When i looked into a bouzouki i was suprised to find it lined by something resembling gaffa tape! seems this is the norm and i don't know my bouzouki's from my elbow  

I still might try to get a bouzouki next time i get to crete.

Until then it's strats all the way

Mick

Offline harribobs

  • Regulars
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1830
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - harribobs
    • View Profile
    • http://themanchesters.org
    • Email
1st visit to Plakia
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2004, 02:39:25 PM »
Quote
When i looked into a bouzouki i was suprised to find it lined by something resembling gaffa tape! seems this is the norm and i don't know my bouzouki's from my elbow  

I still might try to get a bouzouki next time i get to crete.

Until then it's strats all the way

Mick
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=2495\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

probably holding the struts on!  

martins for me!